How The Leading Hotelier Training Manual is going to help you

BENEFITS FOR:

 

  • RESTAURANT OWNERS

  • HOTEL OWNERS

  • increase productivity

  • improve the quality of work

  • reduce faults, waste or customer complaints with streamlined processes and more competent staff

  • positively affect staff morale and motivation

  • reduce staff turnover and absenteeism

  • help your business adapt to change and prepare for growth 

  • give you a competitive advantage over your business rivals 

  • help you attract top talent if your business is seen as one that values and invests in their workers 

  • Enhanced company image

BENEFITS FOR:

 

  • MANAGERS

  • WAITERS

  • WAITRESSES

  • can take you into other positions within the industry – positions with better prospects and/or better pay

  • improve the quality of your work and skills

  • Improve your self-esteem, keeping you motivated and fresh

  • Increased job satisfaction and morale

  • give you a competitive advantage for a promotion over your colleagues 

References / Testimonials

Caroline Filtzinger, Hotel Manager

Anna Michaelides, Director of Thanos Hotels

Christos Papamiltiadous, General Manager

Thanos Michaelides, Director of Thanos Hotels

Anne Maingi, Learning & Development Manager

Natasha Michaelides, Director of Thanos Hotels

Wilhelm Luxem, General Manager

Uwe Opocensky, Executive Chef

York Brandes, General Manager

The A-Z Manual for Restaurants, Cafes, Bars and Hotels 

The Leading Hotelier Service Training Manual
Screenshot 2018-07-14 12.50.49.png

From €394   

Now Only €97

MONEY-BACK 100% GUARANTEE

 

This program is backed by a 100% money back guarantee for 60 full days from your original purchase. If you're not totally and completely satisfied with this program, your results or your experience in the first 60 days from your purchase simply let us know by dropping us an email and we'll give you a full refund within 48 hours.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
DINNER & LUNCH STANDARDS

CHAPTER 1

1.1.1 Introduction (page 13)

1.1.2 Introduction to Lunch and Dinner Standards

1.1.3 Anticipatory Service and Luxury Outlook

1.2 Lunch and Dinner Reservations (page 15)

1.2.1 Taking a Reservation

1.2.2 Preparing for a Reservation

1.3 Lunch and Dinner Setup (page 18)

1.3.1 Setting the Tone for a Perfect Service

1.3.2 The Table Setting

1.3.3 The Side Station

1.3.4 Buffet Setup and Maintenance Guidelines

1.4 Guest Arrival (page 24)

1.4.1 Greeting the Guests

1.4.2 Escorting and Seating the Guests

1.4.3 Handling Walk-in Guests

1.5 Menu Presentation (page 27)

1.5.1 Menu and Product Knowledge

1.5.2 Presenting an à la Carte Menu

1.6 Beverage Service (page 29)

1.6.1 Taking a Beverage Order

1.6.2 Long and Soft Drink Service

1.6.3 Water Service

1.6.4 Beer Service

1.6.5 Wine Service

1.6.6 Tea and Coffee Service

1.7 Food Service (page 36)

1.7.1 Serving an à la Carte Order

1.7.2 Table Service for Buffet Diners

1.7.3 Following Up

1.8 Guest Departure (page 41)

1.8.1 Handling the Bill

1.8.2 Farewell

1.9 Conclusion (page 43)

1.9.1 Concluding Lunch and Dinner Standards

 

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SERVICE PROFESSIONAL

CHAPTER 1

1.1 Understanding the Dining Experience (page 45)

1.1.1 The Ten Phases of Service

1.1.2 Extended Menu Sequence

1.1.3 Service Styles

1.1.4 The Five Senses in Guest Areas

1.1.5 Five Senses – Interactive Analysis

1.2 Roles and Responsibilities (page 47)

1.2.1 Who’s Who in Service

1.2.2 Who’s Who in the Kitchen

1.2.3 Teamwork

1.2.4 Duties and Checklists

1.2.5 Sections and Position numbers

1.3 Appearance, Hygiene and Uniform (page 50)

1.3.1 Hygiene and Appearance

1.3.2 Uniform

1.3.3 The Waiter’s Toolkit

1.3.4 Hygiene in a Food Service Environment

1.4 Basic Communication (page 52)

1.4.1 Body Language – The Basics

1.4.2 Common Mistakes and Bad Habits

1.4.3 Communicating with Colleagues – Before Service

1.4.4 Communicating with Colleagues – During Service

1.4.5 Communicating with Colleagues – After Service

1.5 Cutlery (page 54)

1.5.1 Introducing Cutlery

1.5.2 The Starter Knife and Fork

1.5.3 The Main Course Knife and Fork

1.5.4 The Fish Knife and Fork

1.5.5 The Steak Knife

1.5.6 The Butter Knife

1.5.7 The Cheese Knife

1.5.8 The Oyster Fork

1.5.9 The Teaspoon and Demitasse Spoon

1.5.10 The Soup Spoon

1.5.11 The Dessert Spoon and Dessert Fork

1.5.12 Polishing Cutlery

1.5.13 The Rules of Cutlery

1.6 Crockery (page 59)

1.6.1 Introducing Crockery

1.6.2 Polishing Crockery

1.6.3 The Rules of Crockery

1.7 Glassware (page 60)

1.7.1 Polishing Glassware

1.7.2 The Rules of Glassware

1.7.3 Tumbler Glasses

1.7.4 Stemware

1.8 Linen and Table Décor (page 63)

1.8.1 The Fundamentals of Linen

1.8.2 Rules of Linen

1.8.3 The Simple Square Napkin Fold

1.8.4 The Simple French Napkin Fold

1.8.5 The Pyramid Napkin Fold

1.8.6 The Cutlery Napkin Fold

1.8.7 The Bread Pouch Napkin Fold

1.8.8 The Lily Napkin Fold

1.8.9 The Bird of Paradise Napkin Fold

1.8.10 The Bishop’s Hat Napkin Fold

1.8.11 The Diamond Napkin Fold

1.8.12 The Rosebud Napkin Fold

1.8.13 Linen During Service

1.8.14 Table Décor

1.9 Setting Up a Dining Room (page 73)

1.9.1 Getting the Guest Information

1.9.2 Cleaning the Dining Area

1.4.3 Tables and Chairs

1.9.4 Setting a Table

1.9.5 A Focus On – Setting a Big Round Table

1.9.6 A Focus On – White Gloves

1.9.7 The Waiter’s Station

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SERVICE PROFESSIONAL

CHAPTER 2

2.1 Basic Guest Communication (page 77)

2.1.1 Basic Guest Communication

2.1.2 Words to Serve

2.1.3 The Centre Line

2.2 Restaurant Reservations (page 79)

2.2.1 The Hosting Station

2.2.2 Taking a Detailed Reservation

2.2.3 Scenarios

2.2.4 Reading the Day Sheet

2.2.5 The Greeting

2.2.6 Coats and Bags

2.2.7 Escorting the Guest

2.2.8 Seating the Guest

2.2.9 Seating – The Finer Details

2.2.10 The Orientation and Menu Delivery

2.2.11 A Focus On – Describing the Service Style

2.2.12 The Farewell

2.2.13 Dealing with Lost Property

2.2.14 Interactive Analysis – Good Host/Bad Host

2.3 Trays and Trolleys (page 83)

2.3.1 Understanding Trays

2.3.2 Carrying Trays

2.3.3 Attention to Detail – Handling Trays

2.3.4 The Buddy System

2.3.5 Trolleys

2.4 Drinks Service (page 85)

2.4.1 Understanding Drinks Service

2.4.2 Water Service

2.4.3 Bar Terminology

2.4.4 Taking a Drinks Order

2.4.5 Serving Drinks

2.4.6 Serving Drinks – The Finer Details

2.4.7 Clearing Spills

2.5 Bread and Canapé Service (page 87)

2.5.1 Serving Bread at the Table

2.5.2 Bread Baskets and Trays

2.5.3 The Silver Service of Bread

2.5.4 Attention to Detail – Bread Service

2.5.5 Canapé Service

2.6 Understanding the Pass (page 89)

2.6.1 The Food Pass

2.6.2 The Beverage Pass

2.7 Table Service (page 89)

2.7.1 Understanding Table Service

2.7.2 Carrying Plates

2.7.3 Preparation – Four Minute Check

2.7.4 Preparation – One-minute Check

2.7.5 Delivering Plates to the Table

2.7.6 Delivering Plates on Trays

2.7.7 Delivering Different Dishes

2.7.8 Two-Minute Check

2.7.9 When to Clear Plates

2.7.10 How to Clear Plates

2.7.11 Decrumbing a Table

2.7.12 Guests Who Smoke

2.7.13 Replacing and Removing Ashtrays

2.7.14 Continuous Checks in the Dining Room

2.7.15 A Focus On – Silver Service

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SERVICE PROFESSIONAL

CHAPTER 3

3.1 Menu Preparation (page 95)

3.1.1 Preparing the Menu

3.1.2 Learning the Menu

3.1.3 Practicing your Communication

3.1.4 Learning Difficult Terms

3.1.5 Allergens

3.1.6 Special Dietary Requirements

3.2 Menu Recommendation (page 97)

3.2.1 The Recommendation Step by Step

3.2.2 Tailoring your Recommendation

3.2.3 A Focus On – Chalkboard Menu

3.3 The Docket System (page 97)

3.3.1 Understanding the Docket System

3.3.2 The Waiter’s Docket

3.3.3 The Flow of the Docket

3.4 Taking Orders (page 98)

3.4.1 Taking Guests’ Orders

3.4.2 Staggering Orders

3.5 Payment and the Bill (page 99)

3.5.1 Presenting the Bill

3.5.2 Payments and Gratuities

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SERVICE PROFESSIONAL

CHAPTER 4

4.1 Aperitifs, Digestifs and Cigar Service (page 100)

4.1.1 Introducing Aperitifs

4.1.2 Introducing Digestifs

4.1.3 Cigar Service

4.2 Wine Service (page 101)

4.2.1 Taking a Wine Order

4.2.2 Presenting the Wine

4.2.3 Opening a Bottle of Wine

4.2.4 The Three Methods of Opening Wine

4.2.5 Serving Wine

4.2.6 Understanding Decanting

4.2.7 Understanding Old Wine

4.2.8 How to Decant Wine

4.2.9 Tips for Decanting

4.2.10 Wine by the Glass

4.3 Sparkling Wine Service (page 104)

4.3.1 Understanding Sparkling Wine

4.3.2 Taking an Order and Presenting Sparkling Wine

4.3.3 Opening and Serving Sparkling Wine

4.4 Coffee and Tea Service (page 105)

4.4.1 Coffee Service

4.4.2 Teas and Tea Service

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SERVICE PROFESSIONAL

CHAPTER 5

5.1 Dealing with complaints (page 109)

5.1.1 Getting Ready to Deal with Complaints

5.1.2 The Principles of Dealing with Complaints

5.1.3 Guests with Unrealistic Expectations

5.1.4 The Drama Queen Complainer

5.1.5 The Serial Complainer

5.1.6 The Non-Complainer

5.2 Adapting Service (page 111)

5.2.1 Lounge Service

5.2.2 Pool Service

5.2.3 Breakfast Service

5.2.4 A Focus on Table-side Service

5.3 Tailoring Service (page 112)

5.3.1 Understanding Tailoring

5.3.2 Tailoring for Special Occasions

5.3.3 Tailoring for Couples

5.3.4 Tailoring for Elderly Guests

5.3.5 Tailoring for Families and Children

5.3.6 Tailoring for Business People

5.3.7 Tailoring for Food Enthusiasts

5.3.8 Tailoring for Guests with Special Needs

5.3.9 Tailoring for Return Guests

5.4 Types of waiters (page 114)

5.4.1 The Klutz

5.4.2 The Snob

5.4.3 The Joker

5.4.4 The Grump

5.4.5 The Newbie

5.4.6 The Spinner

5.4.7 The Talker

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SUGGESTIVE SELLING

CHAPTER 1

1. Introducing Suggestive Selling (page 117)

1.1 What is Suggestive Selling?

1.2 The Importance of Suggestive Selling

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SUGGESTIVE SELLING

CHAPTER 2

2. Suggestive Selling and F&B (page 118)

2.1 Suggestive Selling and Up-Selling

2.2 Opportunities for Suggestive Selling

2.3 Reading the Guest

2.4 The Journey of Suggestive Selling

2.5 The Principles of Suggestive Selling

 

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SUGGESTIVE SELLING

CHAPTER 3

3. Preparation (page 124)

3.1 Menu Knowledge

3.2 Beverage Knowledge

3.3 Pairing Dishes with Beverages

3.4 Flavor Words

3.5 Texture Words

3.6 Advanced Menu Knowledge

 

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SUGGESTIVE SELLING

CHAPTER 4

4. Execution (page 131)

4.1 The Welcome

4.2 The Menu Presentation

4.3 Following Up

4.4 Desserts and Digestifs

4.5 The Don’ts of Suggestive Selling

 

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
SUGGESTIVE SELLING

CHAPTER 5

5. Advanced Suggestive Selling (page 136)

5.1 Repeat Guests

5.2 Continuous Improvement

 

 

 

Desired Outcome of this Training Manual:

• The learner understands the objectives of the Lunch and Dinner Standards course.
• The learner can provide luxurious anticipatory service.
• The learner can take and prepare a reservation.
• The learner understands how lighting, aromas and the music played in the restaurant play roles in setting the tone for a perfect service.
• The learner can set up a table and the area around it, and set a table appropriately.
• The learner understands the purpose of the side station, what is kept there, how to use it when clearing, and what not to do there.
• The learner can effectively set up the buffet and ensure that the correct items and utensils are available, and that everything is clean, neat and hygienic. The learner can also efficiently do a walk-through of the buffet to check that everything is as it should be.
• The learner understands the importance of properly greeting Guests in order to create the ultimate first impression.
• The learner can effectively escort Guests to a table, seat them professionally and confidently introduce the section waiter to the Guests.
• The learner understands who walk-in Guests are, and how to greet and accommodate them for lunch and dinner service.• The learner knows what the purpose of pre-shift briefings are, and the importance of knowing the menu, as well as the hotel and its facilities.
• The learner can professionally present an à la carte menu, and understands the difference between the lunch and dinner menus.
• The learner understands the importance of effectively communicating with Guests during beverage service. They also know the factors of beverage service, and beverage service etiquette.
• The learner knows what long and soft drinks are, and how to serve them.
• The learner understands the importance of knowing if their establishment’s water is hygienic enough to serve to Guests. They will also understand that Guests may prefer to have their water in different ways, and they will know how to serve water.
• The learner knows how to pour a beer, and can ensure that there is always a head of foam when pouring a beer. The learner can also effectively serve a beer.
• The learner can serve wine by the glass and the bottle.
• The learner can serve tea and coffee.
• The learner can take and serve an à la carte order in a timely manner, and ensure that the correct cutlery is placed at each setting for each course.
• The learner can give the Guests an effective orientation of the buffet, and provide buffet service for them.
• The learner knows why, how and when to follow up with Guests, and how to resolve any problems that the Guests might have.
• The learner will know when and how to prepare and present the Guest’s bill. They will also understand all the different payment options that the Guests have.
• The learner will know how to prepare for the Guest’s departure, and how to professionally and elegantly bid them farewell.

• The learner understands the dining experience in terms of menu sequence and the service styles found in food and beverage service in general, as well as understanding which apply to the restaurant where they work.
• The learner understands the dining experience in terms of the Guest’s five senses.
• The learner understands the standard organisational structure and roles found front of house and in the kitchen.
• The learner understands your establishment’s particular structure and where they fit in.
• The learner understands the importance of duties and checklists, knows their duties and acts accordingly.
• The learner understands the importance of hygienic practices and conducts themselves accordingly.
• The learner understands the importance of a clean, neat and hygienic uniform and conducts themselves accordingly.
• The learner understands the importance of hygienic practices in a food service environment.
• The learner understands the basic principles of good, positive body language and acts accordingly.
• The learner understands the importance of effective verbal and non-verbal communication with colleagues before, during and after service.
• The learner can identify the different types of cutlery used in service and knows each item’s purpose.
• The learner understands the importance of hygiene in delivering cutlery to the Guest.
• The learner can identify the different types of cutlery used in service and knows each item’s purpose.
• The learner understands the importance of hygiene in delivering cutlery to the Guest.
• The learner knows how to polish cutlery correctly.
• The learner knows the rules of handling and delivering cutlery.
• The learner can identify the various pieces of crockery and glassware used in service.
• The learner knows how to polish crockery and glassware.
• The learner knows the rules for handling and delivering crockery and glassware.
• The learner can identify the various linen items used in service.
• The learner understands how to handle linen correctly.
• The learner can fold the napkin folds covered in this session.
• The learner can fold the napkin folds covered in this session.
• The learner understands the various items of table décor used in service.
• The learner knows how to set up the dining room from start to finish, including cleaning, preparing the tables and chairs, and setting the table.
• The learner can set a table as per the establishment’s standard.
• The learner understands the purpose of the waiter’s station.
• The learner knows how to reset a table during service.
• The learner understands the basics of professional verbal and non-verbal communication with Guests.
• The learner understands the principles of professional hospitality language.
• The learner understands the information they need to take a reservation professionally and completely.
• The learner understands the information contained a the day sheet.
• The learner is able to greet and seat the Guest professionally and according to the establishment’s standards.
• The learner is able to describe the service style(s) at your establishment professionally and in an appealing manner.
• The learner can bid the Guest farewell in a professional manner.
• The learner knows the lost-property procedure at your establishment.
• The learner can identify the different trays used in service, and knows which trays are appropriate for delivering different food and beverage items and equipment.
• The learner can carry and deliver glasses using a tray.
• The learner knows the uses for trolleys in service and how to display and move a trolley through the dining area.
• The learner can take a drinks order professionally and correctly.
• The learner understands the terminology involved in taking a drinks order.
• The learner can serve drinks professionally and correctly.
• The learner can clean spills professionally, efficiently and safely.
• The learner can provide bread and canapé service professionally, according to the standard at your establishment.
• The learner understands the function and importance of the food and beverage passes.
• The learner understands the checks to be done before delivering dishes to the table.
• The learner can carry and deliver plates in an elegant and controlled manner.
• The learner understands the checks that need to be conducted after dishes have been delivered to the table.
• The learner knows when and how to clear plates.
• The learner knows when and how to decrumb a table.
• The learner can replace ashtrays correctly.
• The learner understands how to do continuous checks in the dining room.
• The learner understands how to deliver silver service.
• The learner knows how to prepare menus before service.
• The learner knows techniques for learning the menu.
• The learner can communicate the menu information and recommend dishes to Guests.
• The learner identifies unknown terms in the menu and finds out what they mean.
• The learner understands common allergens found in food.
• The learner understands common dietary requirements, and which foods are allowed under each.
• The learner knows the steps to making a menu recommendation.
• The learner knows how to tailor menu items to different types of Guests.
• The learner understands chalkboard menus and how to present them.
• The learner understands the different dockets used in the docket system, what information is included on each, and why.
• The learner understands how a docket system ensures that information is handed over from the Guest to the kitchen.
• The learner is able to take full, correct orders in a professional manner.
• The learner understands the concept of ‘staggering’ orders, and the ways in which this can be done.
• The learner knows when to prepare and present the bill.
• The learner knows how to handle different kinds of payments and gratuities.
• The learner understands aperitifs, digestifs and cigar service.
• The learner knows the appropriate times to offer aperitifs, digestifs and cigar service.
• The learner understands the procedures of wine service.
• The learner is able to deliver wine service correctly and professionally.
• The learner understands the purpose and procedure of decanting wine and acts accordingly.
• The learner understands how to adapt wine service for wine by the glass.
• The learner understands the procedures of sparkling wine service.
• The learner is able to deliver sparkling wine service correctly and professionally.
• The learner understands the procedures of coffee and tea service.
• The learner is able to deliver coffee and tea service correctly and professionally.
• The learner is able to deal with complaints in a professional, efficient manner.
• The learner can adjust their service for different types of complaining Guests.
• The learner is able to adapt the principles of service to different areas and situations.
• The learner is able to adapt the principles of service to different types of Guests.
• The learner understands some of the common mistakes waiters make during service, and knows the steps to take to rectify these mistakes.

• The learner understands what suggestive selling is.
• The learner understands the importance of suggestive selling in the Food and Beverage Department.
• The learner understands the difference between suggestive selling and up-selling.
• The learner can identify opportunities for suggestive selling.
• The learner can interpret a given situation and Guest type to make appropriate recommendations.
• The learner can identify various opportunities for suggestive selling throughout the dining experience.
• The learner understands the fundamental principles and strategies of suggestive selling.
• The learner understands the importance of menu and beverage knowledge in being able to suggestively sell.
• The learner understands the fundamental principles of pairing beverages and dishes.
• The learner can use texture and flavor words to effectively suggestively sell.
• The learner understands the importance of gaining advanced menu knowledge in order to increase sales.
• The learner is able to suggestively sell at various points through the dining experience.
• The learner knows the bad selling tactics to avoid when serving Guests and acts accordingly.
• The learner understands the importance of creating return Guests to increase revenue.
• The learner understands how to use return Guests’ information to suggestively sell.
• The learner understands the importance of continuously improving their suggestive selling skills.

 

buy-now.gif
buy-now.gif

© 2018 Leading Hotelier, all rights reserved